All posts related to blood oxygen, respiratory

Reasons Why You May Suffer From Low Oxygen Levels

Blood oxygen level is the amount of oxygen circulating in the blood. Most of the oxygen is carried by red blood cells, which collect oxygen from the lungs and deliver it to all parts of the body.

The body closely monitors blood oxygen levels to keep them within a specific range, so that there is enough oxygen for the needs of every cell in the body.


A person’s blood oxygen level is an indicator of how well the body distributes oxygen from the lungs to every cell in your body to allow them to live and function properly.

 

Why Does oxygen Matter?

Oxygen is a very important element because we need it to live. It is a part of the air people breath and the water people drink. Many living things (including humans) need oxygen to live and breathe.

Not enough oxygen makes it to the cells and tissues that make up your body causes a condition called Hypoxia. Lack of oxygen can lead to many serious, sometimes life-threatening complications.

Hypoxia can cause problems with the mitochondria and the brain.

Mitochondria is an organelle found in large numbers in most cells, in which the biochemical processes of respiration and energy production occur and it plays a prominent role which is to produce the energy currency of the cell. Your mitochondria need oxygen.

Mitochondrial problems are at the heart of all chronic diseases.

When your mitochondria are working well, you will build up healthy levels of ATP and NAD+ levels, which are important for energy utilization and metabolism.

ATP converts to a cyclic AMP, which is a critical messenger molecule for so many cellular processes. the cAMP is needed for the regulation of glycogen, sugar, and lipid metabolism.

The following hormones also require adequate cAMP levels to function optimally: FSH, LH, ADH (V2=kidneys), TSH, CRH, hCG, ACTH, MSH, PTH, PTH, GHRH, Glucagon, and Calcitonin.

Your body fights infections with the superoxide that’s created from oxygen.

Your health and energy will in part depend on how much oxygen you have and how well your mitochondria utilize it.

Now there’s obviously more to the story, but you want to make sure the fundamentals are right.

How To Measure Your Oxygen Level?

Pulse Oximeter and Hypoxia

A pulse oximeter is the easiest method to measure blood oxygen, but it’s only a part of the story. 

A pulse oximeter is a small clip that is often put on a finger, although it can also be used on the ear or toe. It measures blood oxygen indirectly by light absorption through a person’s pulse. Although the pulse oximeter test is easier, quicker, and not painful, it is not as accurate as the ABG test. This is because it can be influenced by factors such as dirty fingers, bright lights, nail polish, and poor circulation to the extremities.

For people who wish to purchase a pulse oximeter, there is a range of easy-to-use devices available online http://torontek.com/

Blood Test and Hypoxia

Red blood cells carry hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. The more red blood cells you have, the more you can carry oxygen. Hemoglobin actually carries the oxygen. The more hemoglobin you have, the more oxygen you transport.

Hemoglobin comprises about a third of the total red blood cell volume. This protein is responsible for the transport of more than 98% of the oxygen (the remaining oxygen is carried dissolved in the blood plasma).

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

Red blood cells and hemoglobin are all the info you need in your Complete Blood Count to determine your levels of hypoxia.

Low Iron or iron stores can also cause less oxygen utilization because oxygen binds to iron-containing molecules (heme) in your hemoglobin. However, your RBC and hemoglobin will often reflect an iron deficiency.

A low RBC or hemoglobin count indicates that your EPO (Erythropoietin)may be low, all of which are extremely important to oxygenate the blood.  Hemoglobin holds oxygen and RBCs hold hemoglobin. EPO produces both.

EPO is important for mood and memory independent of its effects on RBCs.

Blood Pressure and Hypoxia

You can have good RBCs, hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation, but if your blood isn’t flowing to your brain, it’s meaningless.

Blood pressure is one measure of blood flow.  Higher blood pressure can indicate that the blood is more viscous and thick, which will require more force and pressure to move it.  It can indicate blood vessels that are hardened and not able to relax easily. It can indicate lower nitric oxide.

Low blood pressure means that blood is not flowing with a certain force level to reach the brain in optimal concentrations.

Your doctor won’t think anything of a blood pressure of 90/60, but this means that not enough blood is flowing to the brain for optimal function.  Your blood pressure should be 110-120/70-80.

Why You May Be Suffering from Hypoxia?

Few main reasons why you can have lower oxygen.

  • Nasal problems or Mucus
  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea or Low Oxygen During Sleep
  • Living in an Elevated Area
  • Chronic Inflammation
  • Psychological Stress
  • Lower Blood Pressure and Poor Circulation
  • A Lack of Sunlight

How Increase Oxygen

  • Breathing Exerciser
  • Oxygen Concentrator
  • Healthy Fluids
  • Cellular Therapy to Improve Oxygen Levels
  • Be Calm

Some self-care measures can be taken by people to reduce symptoms of shortness of breath and improve general health and quality of life. These include:

  • Quitting smoking
  • Avoiding passive smoking in places where others smoke
  • Eating a healthful diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables
  • Exercising regularly

When To See A Doctor

  • experience severe and sudden shortness of breath
  • experience shortness of breath when at rest
  • have severe shortness of breath that worsens during exercise or physical activity
  • wake suddenly with shortness of breath or a feeling of choking

 

Low oxygen levels in the blood are not necessarily harmful and can occur in people who can recover, or in healthy people when they are at high altitude. These people do not need to monitor their blood oxygen levels regularly.

But people with chronic lung diseases, such as COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, or emphysema, may have blood oxygen levels below the normal because of their illness. These people may require regular blood oxygen monitoring.

People with low blood oxygen can also make lifestyle changes, such as not smoking or improving their diet and exercise habits, as well as being treated with supplemental oxygen.

 

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Resources: https://www.selfhacked.com/blog/why-you-may-be-suffering-from-low-oxygen-and-not-realize-it/

 

5 Chronic Lung Disease that Often Require Oxygen Therapy

Your lungs have a very important job which is to absorb oxygen from the air and transfer it into your bloodstream, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). But some diseases and conditions can keep your body from getting the oxygen it needs. People with chronic diseases have ineffective or heavy breathing pattern 24/7 with deep breathing 24/7. If you develop one of these conditions, and your blood oxygen level falls too low, your doctor may prescribe supplemental oxygen and a finger pulse oximeter to monitor the oxygen level.

Oxygen therapy, also known as supplemental oxygen, is the use of oxygen as a medical treatment. This can include low blood oxygen, carbon monoxide toxicity, cluster headaches, and to maintain enough oxygen while inhaled anesthetics are given. Supplemental oxygen, especially portable oxygen solutions, helps those with chronic lung diseases to enjoy life to the fullest. A portable oxygen unit, like a portable concentrator, can help you regain your independence and mobility while allowing you to increase your physical fitness, as well as time spent with family and friends.

While considering carbon dioxide effects, we also found that chronic overbreathing leads to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns cause tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other negative effects caused by low body-oxygen levels and hypocapnia (reduced CO2 levels).

Meanwhile, it is known that tissue hypoxia is the driving force of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue and many other health conditions. Hence, the more people breathe, the more severe health problems, diseases, and symptoms they are going to experience.

The following are Conditions and Diseases that may require supplemental oxygen to help you feel better:

  • Cystic Fibrosis. An inherited disease that affects the secretory glands, including those that produce mucus and sweat, according to NHLBI. One of the causes of Cystic Fibrosis is Chronic Hyperventilation. Unfortunately, with CF, thick sticky mucus collects in the airways, creating an ideal place for bacteria to grow. After repeated, intense lung infections, the lungs become severely compromised. Supplemental oxygen can help the lungs do their job.

 

  • Pulmonary fibrosis. A lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred.  A person is often diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) when tissues in the lungs become thickened, stiff and make it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath. The Mayo Clinic provides many reasons someone could develop PF, including long-term exposure to occupational toxins, radiation treatment, certain diseases and medical conditions. However, in many cases, the cause remains unknown. As the disease progresses, it decreases the amount of oxygen lungs can transfer to the bloodstream. Supplemental oxygen Helps to reduce breathlessness, while portable solutions enable those with PF to be more physically active.

 

  • Chronic bronchitis: Chronic bronchitis is one type of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). This leads to coughing and difficulty breathing. Cigarette smoking is the most common cause. Breathing in air pollution, fumes, or dust over a long period of time may also cause it. The disease, which will get worse over time, is characterized by a constant cough and a large amount of mucus. When caught early, the disease can then be managed so you can live a full, active life. As the disease progresses, portable oxygen solutions can allow you the mobility and independence you need to get out and moving more often.

 

  • Emphysema: a condition in which the small air sacs of the lungs are damaged and enlarged, causing breathlessness. The No. 1 culprit of an emphysema diagnosis is smoking. This disease makes it harder and harder to breathe normally. Those with emphysema often become short of breath on a regular basis. However, supplemental oxygen can help provide some relief by increasing blood oxygen levels and making oxygen distribution easier on the body.

 

  • Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: An inherited disorder that may cause lung disease and liver disease. This genetic disorder can lead to breathing problems at a young age and eventually develop into emphysema or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), according to WebMD. The Alpha 1 Antitrypsin enzyme is found in the lungs and bloodstream and is meant to prevent inflammation and its effects in the lungs. When your body lacks enough of this enzyme, it can lead to emphysema and make it difficult to breathe. NHLBI says supplemental oxygen, along with bronchodilators and pulmonary rehabilitation, are common treatments of AAT deficiency.

The critical oxygen level is an oxygen saturation of approximately 90% (this is measured by a finger pulse oximeter), equivalent to a blood oxygen level of 55-60 mmHg (this is measured from a blood sample taken from an artery, commonly in the wrist). This blood test is known as an arterial blood gas or ABG. Therefore, controlled oxygen therapy, to maintain oxygen saturation at around 90% (88-92% is an acceptable range). It is important to avoid too much oxygen and minimize the risk of worsening CO2 levels in this situation. Some patients who are very sensitive to the adverse effects of too much oxygen may choose to wear a medical alert bracelet to alert paramedics about their lung condition in the event of an emergency.

 

 

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

 

Resources:

http://www.domorewithoxygen.com/bid/293363/5-chronic-lung-diseases-that-often-require-oxygen-therapy

 

Second Trimester Must-Haves

Pregnancy brings a new meaning to the concept of beauty. It is a period of immense joy coupled with excitement. The feeling of carrying a little soul within you is magnificent. Pregnancy is a time to celebrate because a little angel is coming soon.

 

 

The second trimester is the best part of pregnancy. Your nausea has subsided, you’re sleeping a little better,  plus you’re finally looking legitimately pregnant. You will still probably use some of the things off of my first-trimester must-haves, but below are the list of additional must-haves for a happy second trimester!

 

Maternity wear

Clothes are definitely getting tighter at this point of your pregnancy so you’ll want to invest in some new clothing. I recommend loose dresses because not only are they comfortable, but they can grow with you and be worn after you have a baby. As your baby belly grows you’ll need a few key items of maternity wear. A good pair of maternity jeans that make you feel comfortable and will last you through the pregnancy is a savvy buy.

Sleep Aids

By now you may need some extra help getting a good night’s sleep. Fans, noise machines, earplugs, and body pillows are all useful aids for helping pregnant women get their zzz’s.

Comfy Pajamas

It’s common to feel really tired while pregnant. Your body is going through so much and working hard so you definitely want to get as much sleep/rest while you can and you will be most comfortable sleeping on your side as your belly grows. Now that your old pajamas probably don’t exactly fit so well anymore, it’s time to get a few pairs of comfortable Pajamas to survive these last few months.

Support Bra

By this stage – if not before – your breasts may have grown and felt more sensitive.Traditional bras don’t have room for the diaphragm to grow during pregnancy and they also have a traditional underwire which is not recommended to wear while pregnant or nursing. Having wider straps on a maternity bra is also important for support, especially for larger cup bras.Maternity bras provide firm elastic support without using wires.

Doula

A doula is a professional trained in childbirth who provides emotional, physical, and educational support to a mother who is expecting, is experiencing labor, or has recently given birth. The doula’s purpose is to help women have a safe, memorable, and empowering birthing experience. Whether you want a natural birth, a medicated birth, or a c-section, a doula is a great person to add to your support team to help you have the positive experience that you want.This is the time during your pregnancy to start interviewing and choosing the right doula for you.

Pregnancy books

Reading is one of the most vital talents a child needs in order to be successful in life. Books are one’s best friend and the early we inculcate this habit, it is excellent for the child.  Reading while pregnancy not only increases the knowledge but also helps in making the bond between the mother and the baby stronger. It also triggers better concentration, a good attention span, distressing the mother of her tensions, resulting in a smarter baby.

 

 

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Resources:

https://www.baby-chick.com/second-trimester-must-haves/
https://www.babycenter.com/0_pregnancy-shopping-checklist-second-trimester_5679.bc

 

Hypoxia and Hypoxemia

Hypoxia deficiency in the amount of oxygen reaching the tissues.

Hypoxemia an abnormally low concentration of oxygen in the blood.

 

When your body doesn’t have enough oxygen, you could get Hypoxemia or hypoxia. These are dangerous conditions. Without oxygen, your brain, liver, and other organs can be damaged just minutes after symptoms start.

Hypoxemia (low oxygen in your blood) can cause hypoxia (low oxygen in your tissues) when your blood doesn’t carry enough oxygen to your tissues to meet your body’s needs. The word hypoxia is sometimes used to describe both problems.

Symptoms

Although they can vary from person to person, the most common hypoxia symptoms are:

  • Changes in the color of your skin, ranging from blue to cherry red
  • Confusion
  • Cough
  • Fast heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating
  • Wheezing
  • The inability to communicate
  • Possible Coma or death

How It’s Treated

You’ll need to go to the hospital to get treatment for hypoxia and to keep a check on your oxygen level.

The most important thing is to get more oxygen into your body. You’ll receive it through a small plug in your nose or through a mask that covers your nose and mouth. For many people, this is enough to bring your oxygen level up to normal.

An inhaler or asthma medicine by mouth may make breathing easier. If these don’t help, the doctor might try giving you medicine through a vein in your arm (an IV). You might also need steroid drugs for a short time to shrink inflammation in your lungs.

When your life is in danger and other treatments aren’t working, you may need a machine to help you breathe.

Causes of Hypoxia

A severe asthma attack, or flare, can cause hypoxia in adults and kids. During an attack, your airways narrow, making it hard to get air into your lungs. Coughing to clear your lungs uses even more oxygen and can make symptoms worse.

Hypoxia can also result from lung damage due to trauma.

Other things can cause hypoxia include:

  • Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) emphysema, bronchitis, pneumonia and pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs)
  • Strong pain medicines and other drugs that hold back breathing
  • Heart problems
  • Anemia (a low number of red blood cells, which carry oxygen)
  • Cyanide poisoning (Cyanide is a chemical used to make plastics and other products.)

Preventing Hypoxia

The best way to prevent hypoxia is to keep your asthma under control, every day. Stick with your asthma treatment plan.

  • Take your medicine to help prevent flares and the need to use your rescue inhaler.
  • Eat right and stay active.
  • Know your asthma triggers, and find ways to avoid them.

Work with your doctor to come up with an action plan for asthma attacks, so you know what to do when you have trouble breathing.

How is hypoxia and/or hypoxemia diagnosed?

In general, an individual patient’s hypoxemia is usually diagnosed by oxygen monitors placed on fingers or ears (pulse oximeter) and/or by determining the oxygen level in a blood gas sample (a sample of blood taken from an artery ). Normal readings are about 94% to 99% oxygen saturation levels; generally, oxygen is supplied if the level is about 92% or below.

Other tests may be ordered to determine if other potential problems such as carbon monoxide poisoning are responsible for the hypoxia.

Pulmonary function tests may also be ordered along with other studies to help determine the cause of unexplained low oxygen saturation.

 

 

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

 

Resources:

https://www.medicinenet.com/hypoxia_and_hypoxemia/article.htm

https://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/hypoxia-hypoxemia#1

Importance of Knowing your Blood Oxygen Level

While most people are concerned over vital signs including their pulse, temperature, blood pressure and respiratory rate, a little less understood science when measuring fitness levels of an individual is the idea of measuring one’s blood oxygen level, SPo2. Oxygen saturation is presented in the form of a percentage that refers to the fraction of oxygen-saturated hemoglobin that is relative to the total hemoglobin, unsaturated and saturated, in the blood. In simpler terms, it is the level of oxygen available in the blood. If the individual is in good health, normal blood oxygen levels almost always fall within a very predictable range of between 95% to 100%. This means that the body is getting sufficient oxygen to be able to perform the necessary basic functions and that the internal organs are performing at their best. Not only that, blood oxygen levels in the body also has an effect on how effective workout sessions are.

The usual procedure of measuring oxygen saturation, to measure the blood that is still carrying or is saturated with oxygen, is with the use of a pulse oximeter http://www.torontek.com. Pulse oximetry is considered to be a non-invasive and painless method of getting a general idea of oxygen delivery to peripheral tissues, like the finger, earlobe and nose, where a clip-like device called a probe, is placed on those body parts. However, it is necessary at times to analyze blood taken directly from the artery, more commonly known as arterial blood oxygen. A normal arterial blood oxygen level usually falls between 75 and 100 mmHg. Blood carbon dioxide level and pH, the measure of acidity or alkalinity, can also be measured with the arterial blood oxygen level.

“Pulse oximetry is a way to measure how much oxygen your blood is carrying. By using a small device called a pulse oximeter, your blood oxygen level can be checked without needing to be stuck with a needle. The blood oxygen level measured with an Oximeter is called your oxygen saturation level.”

Regularly checking of your SPo2 levels can help you keep track of how the body is performing over time, and can provide early warning signs to potential problems that your body may potentially be facing.

 

How does a pulse oximeter work?

A pulse oximeter comes either as a small unit with a built in finger/toe clip, or a small hand held device that has a wire probe that can attach or be applied to your finger, toe or earlobe. The small unit is less expensive and more practical for home use. Beams of light from the device pass through the Pulse oximetry is a way to measure how much oxygen your blood is carrying. By using a small device called a pulse oximeter, your blood oxygen level can be checked without needing to be stuck with a needle. The blood oxygen level measured with an oximeter is called your oxygen saturation level (abbreviated O2sat or SaO2). This is a percentage of how much oxygen your blood is carrying compared to the maximum it is capable of carrying. Normally, more than 89% of your red blood should be carrying oxygen. blood in your finger (earlobe or toe) to measure your oxygen. You will not feel this happen. The beams of light are “read” to calculate the percentage of your blood that is carrying oxygen. It also provides a reading of your heart rate (pulse). To make sure the oximeter is giving you a good reading, count your pulse for one minute and compare the number you get to the pulse number on the oximeter. If they are the same, you are getting a good signal.

 

Should I get a pulse oximeter?

Most people do not need a pulse oximeter. Some people are prescribed a pulse oximeter if they have or could have periods of low oxygen; for example, when you are exercising or if you travel to high altitude. Having a pulse oximeter in these cases will allow you to monitor your blood oxygen level and know when you need to increase your supplemental oxygen flow rate. Ask your health care provider what oxygen saturation number(s) they want you to maintain. Pulse oximeters are available online http://www.torontek.com  or by prescription from your local pharmacy or medical supply company.

 

Worry NO More

Every individual aim to have a peace of mind knowing there is device we can carry along in monitoring pulse rate.

Pulse oximetry is universally used for monitoring patients in the critical care setting.It is, a straightforward method for estimating arterial oxygen saturation, can detect hypoxemia early; Using spectrophotometric methodology, pulse oximetry measures oxygen saturation by illuminating the skin and measuring changes in light absorption of oxygenated (oxyhemoglobin) and deoxygenated blood (reduced hemoglobin).It’s a device intended for the non-invasive measurement of arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate.

Patients should monitor oxygen saturation with pulse oximeters while exercising so they can adjust the pace as the oxygen saturation decreases.Oximeters are inexpensive and can report an accurate reading within seconds. Speed is important especially in an emergency situation.For many patients, doctors often recommend exercise to improve their physical stamina and overall fitness. However exercise can result in increasing shortness of breath. It can also help athletes in high altitude training. The reduction in oxygen level can increase red blood cells in athletes and help to increase his/her endurance. This is a must have device for every individual!